Throwback Saturday: The Benefits of Classical Literature

Library Literature Books Reading

Across the United States, an epidemic is spreading. Widespread famine has occurred, leaving thousands empty and seeking answers. This famine is brought about by a lack of love for literature and reading, and it has affected nearly every single student in the United States of America. Libraries, once filled with throngs of adoring readers, now sit empty and still, unused and unloved. Book stores close down and file for bankruptcy since many of the books they once sold can now be found on Kindle. Kids, instead of spending their time reading healthy books, play video games or text friends, choosing a digital world over a created one. If children do not put down their devices and read, America’s future generation will crumble into ruin, for the consequences of not reading are dire indeed. If, however, students learn to read again, America’s youth will thrive, for reading not only promotes healthy imagination and learning, but also creativity and studiousness.

A rediscovery of reading in the students of America will create healthy imagination within readers. If students learn to read classical literature instead of the texts and posts they commonly find on their phone, they will learn creativity and imagination, creating healthy patterns within younger children. Without imagination, what good is it to study? When a student attempts school without a strong desire to learn and imagine, they become a mindless robot, incapable of accomplishing great feats identical to those of their forefathers before them.

The promotion of learning, as found within reading, is extremely vital for the health of our young generation. After all, if one expects to learn, they must be prepared to study, and the only way to do so is found within reading. No sane student can enter school and expect to not read for the following years to come. If a student wishes to excel in academic proceedings, he must develop a deep desire and love for reading, as can only be found within classical literature. While modern literature may be enjoyable, it has no benefits for a student’s grammar or literature grades, and textbooks will do positively nothing to improve a student’s grade in those particular classes either. Thus, classical literature is the answer that every needy student must turn to, lest they risk failure in High School.

A desire to read will promote creativity. Not to be confused with imagination, creativity is another crucial part of advanced learning. Mankind’s greatest inventions –chocolate, bacon, coffee, the internet, the printing press, and the alphabet– would never have been conceived if not for a healthy dose of creativity. When combined, imagination and creativity are some of the most powerful weapons a teenager can have. Together, they give a young man or woman the power to think and create, ask questions and discern answers. Once again, without creativity, man becomes a mindless robot, incapable of accomplishing any kind of deed.

The greatest feature literature can encourage within a student is studiousness. Without literature, a good, healthy desire for studiousness cannot be found. However, when a student willingly decides to read healthy literature, a switch is flipped within their mind, and they discover a deep-seated love and admiration for the true classics. This, in return, will encourage them to read more, and will eventually give them the mental capabilities they need to read the greatest works by classical authors, such as J.R.R Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, or Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace. When these have been read, there is truly no barrier to stop a student from reading. Anything that a student sets their mind to will be accomplished. If a student desires to read an entire history textbook in one day, then this action will be achieved. When a student with a true love for reading sets his mind on an academic goal, nothing can stop him.

When a student with a true love for reading sets his mind on an academic goal, nothing can stop him.

As aforementioned, a deep love for classical literature will promote many advantageous habits within a student. Even though culture and media state that reading has no advantages, we know better. Reading is one of the greatest habits a child can develop, encouraging imagination, learning, creativity, and studiousness. Without classical literature, our culture will crumble into ruin. Today, right now, we must all make a willing choice to teach our children the benefits of reading.

You can read the original post by clicking here. Shoutout to Katelyn Vergakis for requesting this post a few months ago! Kate, you’re awesome.

Alright, that’s all for today. Thanks so much for reading, and I hope you enjoyed this throwback. If you haven’t already, be sure to click that Follow button below (or to the side), so as to not miss out on any new posts. Thanks again, and I hope you have a wonderful day!

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10 thoughts on “Throwback Saturday: The Benefits of Classical Literature

  1. I started reading this post and was reminded of Kate, and then you mentioned her haha 😂 Love this post! I’ve been chatting with Kate and the Omni brotherhood about LOTR and Pride and Prejudice for the past few days. Quite fun 📚

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: The Blessings of Being A Missionary Kid- A Guest Post by Grace Nelson – Africa Boy

  3. “ If students learn to read classical literature instead of the texts and posts they commonly find on their phone, they will learn creativity and imagination, creating healthy patterns within younger children. Without imagination, what good is it to study? ” I definitely second this!! Well put.

    Liked by 1 person

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